Duck Blinds

About Our Blinds

This Association has provided private duck blinds for over four decades. Many lifetime relationships with some business connections have developed over many years of Association hunters meeting each other in these binds. Include two who would marry later.

Duck Blinds
Duck Blinds
Duck Blinds
Duck Blinds

We’ve used this same design to construct duck blinds for many years. It’s simple. They can be moved easily from one spot to another if we need to do so. Each blind is 10’ long by 5’ wide, framed with 2”x 6” lumber, a roof, floor, seat, gun rack, door. A majority of our managed wetlands flood so we anchor them to permanent 4 x 4 posts. On this particular wetland it does not flood, so we place blinds on cinder blocks then tied down with cable to screw-in earth anchors.

This blind replaced one that produced for over 15 years on a powerful flood plain; South Grand River. We burned the old blind, removed its rubble, floated a new blind piece by piece over mud/water to a mound of dirt. Once our blinds have been assembled we stretch then nail hog wire to front, back, sides, roof.

Duck BlindOur Missouri wetlands on Parsons Creek, Grand River and Big Creek have many species or oak trees surrounding most spots, sloughs, oxbows, creek banks. Pin oaks have strong leafs that don’t drop throughout winter. After we weave rippy grass through hung hog wire we mix cut pin oak limbs with rippy grass to break up its silhouette making a more natural appearance. On our duck blinds we have flip fronts so this natural cover will last until season’s last day.

 

 

Water

Water level is controlled by a drop log structure which allows us to fluctuate water levels. After each season, we either drain enough water to keep surrounding oak trees alive so they can produce acorns.

We drain 90% of Association wetlands if weather permits, but we rotate every year since water is mandatory to duck hunt our duck blinds. We own a 10” portable pump, but use it sparingly as a last resort since it is expensive, labor intense to operate.

Dogs

This blind has dry land next to it for an experienced retriever to sit watching ducks go down.

Duck Blind MapMaps

We furnish all hunters detailed maps of every wetland with blinds numbered. Some can be found during darkness any first time, but we encourage scouting during daylight hours to become familiar with water depth. Decoys are furnished by hunters.

Hunt On Reservation

Like all our hunting, duck blind usage is controlled by our reservation system. Reservations can be made in advance as 30 days prior to any day. Or, a minute ahead of time online 24/7.

Ease Of Access

Some blinds are easy to access. Others difficult. Four-wheelers allowed to haul hunters, their gear to/from duck blinds on all wetlands. But just like scouting, we recommend to become familiar about recent local water conditions during daylight hours for safety purposes.

Duck Blind Map

Our managed Missouri wetlands with duck blinds have all been developed next to rivers or creeks that flood on occasion. We anchor our blinds to endure severe flooding, but every once in a while something gives causing us to loose a one or two. Above, a mound we built to place this duck blind on eroded over several years. Major floodwater toppled it. Carried it over 200 yards from its place of origin. Bruce, Allen plus Jon winched it up on a levee, disassembled then drug it piece by piece using a four wheeler to its mound.

Duck Blind Map

It took some swampland engineering to re-assemble it, but Allen and Bruce have decades of carpentry experience. In a couple of hours it was back up, anchored, ready to be covered for another season. It faces Parsons Creek, which feeds Fountain Grove Wildlife Area in north central Missouri. This marsh covers 60 surface water acres having 2 permanent duck blinds.

Duck Blind Map

Full shooting pool, covered using rippy grass plus pin oak limbs, blind 6 is ready for another waterfowl season.

 

Duck Blind

Duck Blind

 

One of our duck blinds on a Missouri wetland that was drained during summer. A quality stand of volunteer smartweed or millet were established. Shooting pools are mowed around all blinds and wade-in areas, blinds are covered with drain and intake pipes positioned to hold water. Water is not guaranteed without a run off rain during a 60 to 90 day period of time. We rotate which wetlands to drain every year to always have water for our duck hunters.

Duck Blind

Same blind with water that was trapped by closing a drain pipe gate. Without a pump station, natural vegetation is a secure food source since millet or smartweed can survive as long as stalk heads remains above water. Milo, corn or beans will not grow or mature once they are under any depths of water. Duck hunters share an advantage of hunting a variety of blinds in Missouri’s North to Middle Zones, where wetlands food sources with water levels are rotated on a yearly basis. Even during drought years, we have always had enough water to accommodate all of our waterfowl hunters.

Duck Blind

Some duck hunt for fun, others duck hunt to kill ducks. Our duck blinds are available to meet needs of both. During peak migration you can be assured you will see ducks working areas around our duck blinds, but bringing them into shooting range is up to every hunter’s ability.

Duck Blind

Ducks on water.

Our enhanced natural wetlands and blinds are designed to support regular waterfowl season. Any goose activity at a duck blind is a bonus. Hardcore goose hunters we have crop stubble on a variety of open water elsewhere than on developed wetlands.

Duck Blind

However, several Association duck blinds just seem to have that bit of goose attracting extra.

Wetlands primary goose specie is Canada Geese with occasional pass shots at a few snows or spec’s.

Duck Blind

A small flock of late season snow geese with their guard down.

Goose hunters go where geese concentrate on open ponds, irrigation reservoirs, watershed lakes in row crop farmland. There they find Association private land in tens of thousands of acres to scout out where geese are then set up.

Duck Blind

A flock of Canada Geese coming into other than enhanced wetlands lakes after close of regular season.

Duck Blind

This blind, above, is at least a ¼ mile walk through up to hip deep water, but paid off this day. Rare that a waterfowler to carry a camera to a water blind.

Duck Blind

Late season goose from blinds is tough at times, but sometimes easy like the photo above. This young lady has followed her father for years with great success due to his ability to scout and hand pick days to take his daughter.

An inside view inside our duck blinds. Nothing fancy, but they keep you dry and warm, you’re concealed from ducks sitting on a seat clear of water. Many hunters claim they don’t like to hunt out of blinds because they want to pick their own spot to set up. When temperatures drop below freezing with wind, 99% of our duck hunters head to our permanent blinds.

A view of a decoy spread from inside out of a blind. This particular year this shooting pool was planted to Japanese millet. We were fortunate to get a small overflow to flood this marsh.

Duck Blind

A flock of late season mallards coming into a set of 2 to 3 dozen decoys and 1 robo duck surrounded by flooded millet on an traditional flyway.

Duck Blind

A two man limit of wood duck and teal. Early season action can be furious in both Missouri’s North and Middle Zones. Common species are teal, gadwall, widgeon, woodies, mallard.

Duck Blind